How Does It Feel to Live in a Log House That's Listed in the National Register of Historic Places?


Please support us by clicking here, and we will give you a free subscription to our Country Living magazine, thank you!!!


This log cabin rustic renovation takes a log cabin that is over a century old and makes it shine again. The log cabin was built over a three-year period between 1912 and 1915. The cabin is a 3,600-square-foot log house that was the original summer retreat for Maria and Sam Jackson. Jackson eventually became the owner and publisher of the Oregon Journal newspaper in 1902 and went on to be an influential, and powerful public figure in Oregon politics. The couple used the log cabin as their summer home and named it Alder Lea. The log cabin was designed by Maria, who apparently had the cabin patterned after a house she’d visited in Sweden. The log cabin design also influenced by the couples visits to the East Coast.To build the log cabin the couple brought two Scandinavian craftsmen from Europe in 1912 to oversee the log cabin construction, and local men felled the property’s Douglas fir to build the log house. They brought in more logs from nearby Mount Hood. So it was quite a log home in the making.

Fast forward and couple LaVonne and Larry Haberlach found the log cabin on the market, and soon became the owners. They had each been guests in the log house while in high school, and had always thought the log house to be interesting. As much as they liked the log house, they were even more intrigued by the land that it sat on. The property was once a remote 40-acre property, but when they purchased it was only six acres, and surrounded by urban Portland. Purchasing a log cabin that old, meant that it was going to need some attention. The log house is very big, along with the grounds, and so everything to do with the place takes that much longer. When they buy wood chips, it's not just a few bags, they need to bring in several dump-truck loads.This log cabin renovation became somewhat of a full-time job. One of the first renovation projects they took on after buying the log cabin was the logs. When they purchased the log cabin it hadn't been stained in over 17 years, so the first time they stained it, it took 57 gallons using a sprayer! At the time, they didn't know what they were doing, and it took most of the summer. When they had to stain the log cabin again a few years later, LaVonne went back and did it with a brush. That staining project only took 26 gallons.

Through the years, they have had to restore the rock foundation, replace and redesign the driveway, restore the bathrooms, renovate the kitchen, and replace the fixed-plate windows with handmade paned windows. They have also had to rebuild the covered porch using the same design and many of the same logs, expanded the gardens and are now finishing a big renovation of the carriage house for the log cabin. The couple does most of the work themselves, and only occasionally hire out professionals.On the cabin living site you will find so many great log cabin and log home stories. You will also find fun activities to do at the log cabin, all about log cabin lifestyle, having pets at a log cabin, log cabin community and green ideas at the log cabin. You will also find wildlife at the log cabin, fun, and games, on the water, and tales from the log cabin. This is a great site where you will be inspired by all the log cabin stories and photos that you can find. Log cabin living is a lifestyle enjoyed by people all over the country.


Learn MORE at Cabin Living


The Secrets of Post-And-Beam Log Home Building


How To Build An Underground, Off-Grid, Virtually Indestructible Home


Perfect 232 Sqft Log Cabin Kit for $18,900 ( See what this price includes )


The MOST Luxurious Log Home is the Casa Grande full built for $260,350


Please support us by clicking here, and we will give you a free subscription to our Country Living magazine, thank you!!!



These Surprisingly Inexpensive Log Cabin Kits are All the Rage Now


Fabulous Log Home on the Lake


Real Log Cabins: The Perfect Getaway


If You Think it Looks Nice Inside... You Need to See the OUTSIDE